Sore Fingertips

    • Level   2

    So you just played Rocksmith for 7 hours straight and now your fingers hurt so bad you can't even type on a keyboard? Congratulations...you're becoming a guitar player.

    The best way I've found to deal with sore fingertips is to soak them in cold water for 5-10 minutes after playing. This eases the soreness while also preventing blistering. If you do this when you're first starting out, you'll be able to play more in the beginning.

    As your fingers develop calluses, you don't need to do this as often. However if you stop playing for a while, the calluses go away and you have to restart the entire process.

    Keep jammin!

    • Level   4

    When I first started playing guitar 3 years ago I found only playing for 15mins a few times a day worked much better then playing hours on end. You can do over kill if you do it too much at one time.

    "Sure way to make nobody happy is to try and make everybody happy"
    • Level   7

    Im a try this trick.  The tips of my fingers peeled after a day or 2 and the skin under was super sensitive.  Everyone says i would get calluses but it seems to hurt more.  Thanks for the tip.  I probably shouldnt limit play time length too, but once i started it was hard to stop.

    • Level   4

    Another thing that can actually help is to pick up a bottle of "New Skin" from Wal-Mart (or someplace else). Basically this is a liquid bandage. I was skeptical about this, but found that it actually did help a lot. Basically run about 4 layers of it. Be aware that this starts to peel off (just like skin peels). So you need to reapply ever few songs.

     

    Be aware this is a trailer park type of fix and while it helps, it does have its drawbacks (mostly re-applying and peeling). BUT it can get you in a lot of extra play time. One bottle will easily take you from newbie to calluses (heck, half a bottle will).

     

    For me, the way I initially callused my fingertips was via a split practice method. Unfortunately the 'game' is set in a way to make this hard to do, but anyways here was what I did. Work left hand (fretting) techniques until the fingertips started to 'feel it' pretty good. Then, I would just let left hand hand around and do nothing while I worked right hand (strum/pick) techniques. Stuff like strum patterns (there are unlimited strum patterns), arpeggio picking, picking, muting, etc.

     

    After a bit of that, back to the left hand techniques. For the 1st week I probably spent half my time doing the above, and teh other half working on songs. Worked great. (Note: I have callused my fingertips about 10 times over the years, this way was most fingertip friendly).

     

    The bad part is that Rocksmith encourages you to progress in game and teaches very little right hand techniques. What you gotta do (and SHOULD be doing if you really want to learn guitar) is practice outside the game AND try to learn the chords to some songs outside the game as well. If you are into chord playing, strum patterns are HUGE. Pratice them and save your left hand a bit!

    • Level   4

    Oh, one other HUGE thing to note!!! Be sure you are using a light wound string!!! If you are using a heavy guage OR even worse, an Acoustic, yoru fingers are gonna pay dearly.

     

    Dylen says try Ernie Ball Super Slinky strings. Your fingertips will LOVE you!! This should only run about $10.

    • Level   2

    +1 on the Ernie Ball Super Slinkies. They've got enough play in them to allow good string bending without killing your fingers.

    • Level   4

    I love Super Slinkies!! =) You can bend the high E string all the way to the Low E if you wanna (not sure why you wanna, but you could).

    • Level   1

    I'm 36.  I played acoustic for years and went through all the calluses.  Sometimes I wouldn't play for a year, but the pain and calluses stopped returning.  All the nerves in my fingertips are dead, and I couldn't be happier about it.  By the way I finally got an electric 2 years ago and it's like butter in comparison.

    • Level   7

    I am apparently using d'addario regular light 10-46 strings according to my husband (its his guitar).  Im going to play some today i think and soak my fingers after to see if that helps.  If they blister & peel every time its going to get annoying (stupid fingers!)

    • Level   2

    I use D'addario. Heavy Bottom, Light/skinny top.

    I'm a little more rough/hard on my strings/strumming/picking which added a lot of buzzing/vibrating (Felt and heard by me but not on the sound from the amp, but still annoyed the heck out of me). That and I also play acoustic so light strings on my electrics feel weird and like im going to break them. Which i use to do on a regular basis before i swapped to the heavy bottom.I still have light top strings for bending.

    • Level   4

    Buy a cheap nylon string....or man through it.

    • Level   8

    Sin Continuum

    I am apparently using d'addario regular light 10-46 strings according to my husband (its his guitar).  Im going to play some today i think and soak my fingers after to see if that helps.  If they blister & peel every time its going to get annoying (stupid fingers!)

    I have D'Addario 10's on my Ibanez electric. They seem pretty good but I'm still too new to offer a viable opinion. I can't remember what strings are on my Epiphone acoustic.

    The apathy citizens have for their own freedom and liberty is what will bring about the end to both.

    • Level   1

    Ernie Ball Super Slinky is the way to go. whenever i have bought a new guitar, or replaced strings, i always use these.

    one word of advice to beginning guitar players. you don't have to mash the string as hard as you can. that is one thing i always see with new players, and people that i have taught. you just need enough pressure to change the note without muting the string.

    you are a dirty shisno